Human health in areas with industrial contamination

Life beside a large factory which spills out clouds of smoke every day is not something we would call healthy. The same applies to people living in the proximity of other industrial contaminants, like nuclear power plants, mills, chemical plants and so on. This is a major challenge for future generations because we will have more and more people living in urban areas, in proximity to industrial buildings.

Studying human health in areas affected by contaminants of different kinds, especially industrial ones, is a very laborious and complex process. It demands a serious, scientific approach and harnesses the expertise of leading scientists. They have to focus their attention on the health hazards which come as a consequence of large industrial compounds.

The dangerous effects of industrial contamination

People who feel these effects put their lives and lives of their children at stake every day they walk out of their house and travel to work. The dangerous contaminants in the air that surrounds us, in the water we drink and in the soil in which we grow our crops cause serious health problems. Large industrial activities stand behind these hazards in most cases. For example, the petrochemical industry can cause adverse effects on the environment and the health of people living close by. Scientists need to develop methods which we can use to measure or estimate the effects of contamination in affected areas.

We need a joint effort

Fighting against industrial contamination demands a multi-disciplinary approach with the involvement of various social groups. The government will enact the necessary measures, of course, but this needs to be motivated by the civil society, the scientific circles, the medical sector. They all have to work in unison to review evidence, to study the possible solutions, to examine legal possibilities, and, most importantly, to understand the negative consequences on human health. Battling industrial contamination is a very serious undertaking, and we need a joint effort to tackle it. In the end, we will be able to say that we left a cleaner and healthier world for our children and grandchildren.